Nepali Times Asian Paints
From The Nepali Press
Explosive India



When security forces seized explosives the Maoists were trying to smuggle from India some months ago, it was hardly a surprise. In Morang, the rebels were caught with commercial explosives and dynamite that could manufacture nearly 25,000 bombs. Ten days ago, security forces captured a huge stock of materials in Bhairawa: about 25,500 kg of gelatin, 7,500 m of safety fuses, 29,500 (No 27) detonators and 33 electronic detonators. The rebels are in a hurry to win their war against the state and are increasingly relying on bombs rather than guns to create maximum destruction, thus breaching their commitment to not endanger civilians. These raw materials are easily available in India and China but while the northern neighbour has punished Maoists who were caught red-handed with guns on its soil four years ago, India is helping the rebels smuggle explosives when it could easily control the flow of arms. As always, New Delhi has a dual policy towards Nepal. For instance, most of the rebel leaders have safe haven in its territory and are protected by the government. If India is helping Nepal to control the Maoist rebellion in some ways, it is only because it fears the consequences on its own soil if the Maoists were to take power here. As of now, the MCC and PWG have united and Maoist leader Prachanda has proposed merging into a single party.


LATEST ISSUE
638
(11 JAN 2013 - 17 JAN 2013)


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