Nepali Times Asian Paints
Business
Getting over the blame game


KIRAN NEPAL


Chandiraj Dhakal, president, FNCCI
The country's business is not in a good state at all and heading towards disaster. The morale is very low. The pressure from the state is immense: it is looking to us to pay the increasing expenses for security operations. But the government can no longer expect anything from us if it fails to provide peace and security. The private sector has been the victim of the political differences between the king, parties and Maoists. We are the ones who are pressurised to pay both taxes to the state and donations to the rebels.

Binod Bahadur Shrestha, former president, FNCCI
We have the same respect for the palace today as we had when the parties were running the government. But the king and parties have to narrow the gap between them. We made no effort as we were slated as royalists from the beginning. If we are to give priority to peace and security, then we have to cooperate with the king. His step will bring some results.

Binod Chaudhary, president, Confederation of Nepali Industries (CNI)
February First sparked hope that the king would deliver what the parties had failed to. Frankly, there has been no improvement in the situation. Nepal's doors to foreign investors have been gradually closing. China has been providing Rs 800 million and added only Rs 70 million when we asked. Everyone knows that Rs 70 million is really nothing.

Padma Jyoti, Jyoti Group
Entrepreneurs can be vocal only during a normal situation but can say nothing when guns are involved. But some must have made statements against the political parties hoping for something from the king's move. Some individuals from our business community did so to become ministers. There will no future for anyone if the differences between the powers persist.

Prabhakar SJB Rana, chairman, Soaltee Group
The private sector cannot distance itself from the country's situation. The impact of conflict on our economy has occurred not only at a micro level but on a macro scale. The business community wants to be left alone in the conflict between the state and the Maoists. After all, industries are needed whoever comes to power in future.

Rajendra Khetan, vice president, CNI
The entrepreneurs have themselves built a negative image by doing politics instead of business, fuelling conflict with each other, cheating banks and not delivering. The business community failed to act as a catalyst between the king and parties to reduce the conflict. We could have played a key role in that even though this is not possible in the case of the Maoists.

Subash Sanghai, Sanghai Group
Everything is related to poverty. The problem will persist unless poverty is not reduced. But the problem is we don't have any basic policy. People go wherever they find food and don't feel terrorised once they find work. The question is, however, why didn't the political parties support us when the situation demanded? They did not speak a word when the tea businesses closed down. If the parties did not offer support thinking that we were pro-king then they were making a serious error.Everything is related to poverty. The problem will persist unless poverty is not reduced. But the problem is we don't have any basic policy. People go wherever they find food and don't feel terrorised once they find work. The question is, however, why didn't the political parties support us when the situation demanded? They did not speak a word when the tea businesses closed down. If the parties did not offer support thinking that we were pro-king then they were making a serious error.



LATEST ISSUE
638
(11 JAN 2013 - 17 JAN 2013)


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