Nepali Times Asian Paints
From The Nepali Press
We need a unifier



For the last 240 years, the Shah dynasty has directly or indirectly ruled Nepal. In between, the Ranas ruled for 104 years with an iron fist. Over the past 12 years, the country has suffered from malgovernance of political parties. For the last two years, it has been under direct rule of the king. We speak with pride about how we never became foreign slaves. Ironically, we are slaves in our own country. Prithbi Narayan Shah believed in fostering national integrity. None of his successors displayed the same sense of responsibility and dedication to the nation. No ruler was capable of keeping it united. Consequently, Nepal was defeated in the Nepal-British War (1814-16) and we lost much of our territory. In the eyes of the British, the war ended with the recruitment of Gurkhas into their armed forces, thus undermining our Nepali identity. It was only after the 1950 revolution that Nepalis were truly free again.

The Ranas were anglophiles. They sent Nepali boys to die for the British Empire. Nepalis became known as people who were ready to die for foreigners. During 100 years of their autocratic rule, the Ranas pocketed the taxes that poor Nepalis paid. They stashed the money abroad and plundered the treasury to build palaces.

It took two brave patriots like BP Koirala and Ganeshman Singh to usher in democracy. Unlike today's leaders they shared a vision for the country and worked together. Foreseeing trouble, the two leaders warned that fighting for democracy was the easy part. One false step could jeopardise hard-won freedom. But the leaders after them were selfish, with vested interests and no focus on national development. They looted the country and were obsessed with power. Once in the government, there is no question of quitting. This is akin to the Panchayat regime when one could do anything if he made the king happy. Sher Bahadur Deuba, Madhab Nepal, Pasupati Shamsher, Mohammad Mohsin and Sachit Shamsher seem intent on restoring the Panchayat system, which is evident in the way Mohsin advocates authoritarian rule. Good quality and character are virtues of a leader that none of them possess.

The country is witnessing a triangular battle between the king, the Maoists and the political parties. The king is self-centred and will neither bow to anyone nor talk to any party. He is not popular among the public and puts all his trust in the army. Maoist activities are based on violence and they have distanced themselves from the people and their political purpose remains unclear. The political parties lack harmony and cooperation within themselves. They are gradually losing popular support. India, the US, UK and Europe are making it worse with their supply of arms. They have lost hope for the restoration of multiparty democracy. All these signs show that the country will be pushed towards authoritarianism. Nepal desperately needs someone who can unite constitutional powers.
For the last 240 years, the Shah dynasty has directly or indirectly ruled Nepal. In between, the Ranas ruled for 104 years with an iron fist. Over the past 12 years, the country has suffered from malgovernance of political parties. For the last two years, it has been under direct rule of the king. We speak with pride about how we never became foreign slaves. Ironically, we are slaves in our own country. Prithbi Narayan Shah believed in fostering national integrity. None of his successors displayed the same sense of responsibility and dedication to the nation. No ruler was capable of keeping it united. Consequently, Nepal was defeated in the Nepal-British War (1814-16) and we lost much of our territory. In the eyes of the British, the war ended with the recruitment of Gurkhas into their armed forces, thus undermining our Nepali identity. It was only after the 1950 revolution that Nepalis were truly free again.

The Ranas were anglophiles. They sent Nepali boys to die for the British Empire. Nepalis became known as people who were ready to die for foreigners. During 100 years of their autocratic rule, the Ranas pocketed the taxes that poor Nepalis paid. They stashed the money abroad and plundered the treasury to build palaces.

It took two brave patriots like BP Koirala and Ganeshman Singh to usher in democracy. Unlike today's leaders they shared a vision for the country and worked together. Foreseeing trouble, the two leaders warned that fighting for democracy was the easy part. One false step could jeopardise hard-won freedom. But the leaders after them were selfish, with vested interests and no focus on national development. They looted the country and were obsessed with power. Once in the government, there is no question of quitting. This is akin to the Panchayat regime when one could do anything if he made the king happy. Sher Bahadur Deuba, Madhab Nepal, Pasupati Shamsher, Mohammad Mohsin and Sachit Shamsher seem intent on restoring the Panchayat system, which is evident in the way Mohsin advocates authoritarian rule. Good quality and character are virtues of a leader that none of them possess.

The country is witnessing a triangular battle between the king, the Maoists and the political parties. The king is self-centred and will neither bow to anyone nor talk to any party. He is not popular among the public and puts all his trust in the army. Maoist activities are based on violence and they have distanced themselves from the people and their political purpose remains unclear. The political parties lack harmony and cooperation within themselves. They are gradually losing popular support. India, the US, UK and Europe are making it worse with their supply of arms. They have lost hope for the restoration of multiparty democracy. All these signs show that the country will be pushed towards authoritarianism. Nepal desperately needs someone who can unite constitutional powers.


LATEST ISSUE
638
(11 JAN 2013 - 17 JAN 2013)


ADVERTISEMENT









himalkhabar.com            

NEPALI TIMES IS A PUBLICATION OF HIMALMEDIA PRIVATE LIMITED | ABOUT US | ADVERTISE | SUBSCRIPTION | TERMS OF USE | CONTACT