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Collecting rain



SHAHANI SINGH
Raju Dangol, Hem Narayan Shrestha and Gokul Dangal could be the Kathmandu Valley's most invaluable trio this season, given they are rainwater harvesting system technicians. The monsoon still prevails and hundreds of households, old and new, could make use of this basic technology for saving water. The system is simple: rainwater collected in the catchment area (usually the balcony or the roof) is channelled through a coarse mesh to prevent the passage of debris, and into a pipe used to sieve out the first flush of dirty water. The collected water is filtered through bio-sand tanks to rid the water of ammonia, arsenic, iron, and dust, and finally conveyed to reservoirs under and above ground. Excess water can be channelled to recharge the water table underground, staving off some of the hassle of the dry season.

The scarcity of water at present and the prospect of its depletion in the future are incentive enough to consider installing a rainwater harvesting system. The rain in Kathmandu is minimally acidic and only needs the usual filtering and boiling to render it drinkable. With the possibility of collecting plenty of water with a single shower, a rainwater harvesting system can be a workable solution for both households and institutions.

The team of three has installed systems for several hotels and schools across the Valley, including the Summit Hotel, Rosebud School, and Fora Darbar. Their experience, along with formal training from the Council for Technical Education and Vocational Training, means they have strong credibility in their field. According to Dangol, their network of customers has materialised through word-of-mouth and recommendations from organisations such as the NGO Forum, ENPHO and WEPCO, which they used to work with.

 "Our work is to just connect the pipes, install the tanks and ensure the flow of water, so this does not incur a big expense," explains Dangol. The team charges 20 per cent of whatever the equipment costs amount to. While every site has different requirements in terms of tanks, pipes, and the size of catchment area, prices for household installation have ranged from Rs 800 to Rs 100,000, whereas prices for schools and hotels have ranged from Rs 10,000 to Rs 200,000. This monsoon may be almost over, but quick service means you can already benefit from the bounty of the heavens " now and forever.

Contact:
Raju Dangol (9841367690); Hem Shrestha (9841534189); Gokul Dangal (9841797404)

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1. sammy
Sometimes you guys at Nepali Times are just so annoyingly nice. Writing about these guys, putting down their phone numbers so that they can have some business from potential punters, and consequently help conserve water in the city - three birds with a stone huh? 

LATEST ISSUE
638
(11 JAN 2013 - 17 JAN 2013)


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