Nepali Times Asian Paints
From The Nepali Press
Royal silence



King Gyanendra may think he is on the right path, but it is impossible for him not to be aware of Crown Prince Paras' reputation and actions. As a king involved in undertaking microscopic examinations of the misdeeds of politicians, it is hard to believe that he is unaware of his own son's misdeeds. It was because of Paras' past that the king had to declare him crown prince while the nation was distracted by Dasai holidays two years ago.

When the crown prince runs people over on the streets, aims guns at security personnel and opens fire in public places the question arises: do we have laws against such behaviour? Can the king and the royal family be above the law in a constitutional monarchy? These are questions for the drafters, experts and implementers of the constitution.

Even after the crown prince's latest antics the king hasn't shown public discomfiture. Some media sources have suggested that both the king and his son are worried, but how do we know for sure? If the king is really serious about controlling his wayward son, why did he not take any action in the past when the crown prince committed one serious misdemeanour after another?

The king may be keeping quiet to defend himself, but what about the defenders of constitutional monarchy? Have they deserted the shastra and surrendered to sycophancy? The king must make a public pronouncement before this becomes an issue for public debate. He should learn from the Mahabharat and what happened to Dhritarashtra and his son Duryodhana.

If the king and the royalist government keep quiet now, it may be proof that the time has come for this country to start thinking about an alternative to monarchy.


LATEST ISSUE
638
(11 JAN 2013 - 17 JAN 2013)


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